The Assad regime is under immense pressure from inside and outside to the extent it may not survive another month of demonstrations and defections.

As a result of the policies of the Assad family attempting to apply an ideology that worked in the late sixties when their father ascended to power, it has unleashed upon itself forces it is ill-equipped to confront effectively.

On one hand, you have the hundreds of thousands of demonstrators spread across the land challenging with their voices and peaceful disposition a barbaric regime. Moreover, thousands of Syrian army soldiers have defected to add another dimension to the struggle of Syrians. Those defectors have not hesitated to use their weapons to defend themselves and the Syrian street. To some minor benefit of the Syrian civilian population, they have been able to absorb much bandwidth of the regime’s military focus.

On the other hand, you have serious sanctions initiated by the United States and Europe whose bite the regime is feeling when the price of sugar rises from $0.43 to $1.48 per one kilogram in 2 months. The sanctions are also hitting the merchant community hard, one of the regime’s quiet supporters whose wealth is tied to the regime in a scheme straight out of the Godfather movie. Capital flight was the first bead to unravel the economic rosary of Syria.

Further, the regime is also embattling nervous and flustered Syrian high officers who see the writing on the wall and are looking for an occasion to defect. Many won’t take that decision unless they see the US and Europe assisting the Free Syrian Army with weapons and logistics. A decision, hélas, the world impatiently awaits for from the Obama administration.

The west should not listen to the Muslim Brotherhood claiming it does not want foreign intervention because the organization fears that once the US establishes a beachhead of some sort, not necessarily of a military nature, it will uncover the ruse that the MB will seek a democratic government.

If you poll Syrians, the absolute majority would welcome any help. The sooner the US does, the higher the chances of quality defections and the higher the chances of success in getting rid of terror once and for all in Syria.

2 Comments

  1. Don Cox
    September 30, 2011 at 9:18 am — Reply

    The problem with helping the Syrians is the risk of an escalation to open war with Iran.

    • September 30, 2011 at 10:48 am — Reply

      I am not an expert on Iran so my answer may not be accurate. But from the knowledge I have about oppressive regimes, they avoid direct confrontation like the pest. I think if the US stands tall and strong, the Iranians will back down. The region can no longer afford violence and hate whether that of the Mullahs or Assad or Hamas or Hezbollah. It is contagious and Erdogan just opened the curtains on a new chapter of the same dose of poison. I want my people to win Noble Prizes in Sciences and not become suicide bombers. Thanks for your comment..

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