If you want to grasp the breadth of Obama’s foreign policy failures, besides Syria, look to what is happening in Iraq. Below is an article written by Ayad al-Samarrai in Al-Iraq News that provides a glimpse of those failures.

Although the writer predicts the US will move to topple al-Maliki, the writer does not really understand what an impossibility this is as long as Obama is in the White House. Under this administration, Russia, Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Hezbollah, all sworn enemies of American values are now stronger than ever.

 

‘Ignorant’ Iraqi Leaders to Aid Syria, Along with Russians and Iranians (Al-Iraq News, Iraq)

“Moscow and Tehran have begun thinking about a Syria-Iran rescue plan. The idea is to make backdoor use of Iraq, thereby victimizing Iraqis by manipulating their leaders, who are too ignorant to understand what happens behind the scenes of global politics. … Bearing the fact that Maliki is heavily subsidized by America in mind, and that the U.S. seeks to topple all of Maliki’s allies, one can assume that Washington, which brought Maliki to power, began considering abandoning him soon after he visited Russia.”

By Ayad al-Samarrai (Translated By Amel Ben Aissa)

October 18, 2012

With the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on the verge of collapse, the Iranian economy reeling under the strain of sanctions and the rapid collapse of its currency, Moscow and Tehran have begun thinking about a Syria-Iran rescue plan. The idea is to make backdoor use of Iraq, thereby victimizing Iraqis by manipulating their leaders, who are too ignorant to understand what happens behind the scenes of global politics.

This has been made clear by the many recent visits to Iraq by senior Iranian security officers, and Prime Minister al-Maliki’s visit to Russia in search of a new formula for security and military cooperation, which could pave the way to a three-way alliance of Moscow, Tehran and Baghdad – with the latter coming out the big loser.

Maliki’s visit to Moscow was preceded by a surprise visit to Iraqi Kurdistan by Iranian Quds Force Commander Qasem Soleimani, during which he met with President Jalal Talabani [a Kurd] and his senior aides, and with Prime Minister of the Kurdistan Regional Government Nechirvan Barzani, to take their pulse to see how willing they are to cooperate with Tehran in saving Assad‘s regime. And this visit came after Soleimani stopped in Ankara and Damascus. Iran Defense Minister Ahmad Vahidi arrived in Baghdad after Soleimani left, marking an influx into Iraq, Beirut and Ankara of senior Iranian security officials. Now Iran Ambassador to Iraq Hassan Danaii says that President Ahmadinejad plans to visit Baghdad soon after Maliki returns from Moscow.

This swirl of visits, which have taken place with remarkable speed, may result in such a Moscow-Tehran-Baghdad alliance, which will be formed to rescue the Syrian regime, especially after Maliki signed an arms agreement at the Kremlin worth over $4 billion. The deal includes provisions for using Iraq as a transshipment point for weapons supplied by Moscow and Tehran and headed to Syria, to help its besieged regime withstand the popular uprising that has been going on since March of last year. Some of the weapons will also go to Lebanese Hezbullah, as Maliki believes that the survival of his regime is tied to Hezbullah’s continued presence in Lebanon and the survival of Bashar al-Assad. The reason Iraq is being encouraged to step up is that Iran, the main sponsor of Assad and Hezbullah, has an economy nearing collapse due to global oil sanctions imposed as a result of Tehran’s nuclear program.

Maliki’s dependence on weapons supplied by Washington mean that his approach to foreign affairs is subject to strong conditions imposed by the U.S. Washington has warned Baghdad more than once about Iran’s growing influence, and obliges Baghdad to search all Iranian aircraft destined for Syria that pass through Iraqi airspace. And that comes in addition to American policy, which clearly indicates the desire to topple Assad, force Tehran to abandon its nuclear program, and disarm Hezbullah, which it considers a terrorist organization. 

Bearing in mind that Maliki is heavily subsidized by America, and that the U.S. seeks to topple all of Maliki’s allies, one can assume that the United States, which brought Maliki to power, began considering abandoning him soon after he visited Russia  – America’s traditional adversary. Now that Maliki poses a threat to U.S. policy both within Iraq and around the region, the likelihood is that Washington will move to replace Maliki at its earliest possible convenience. Indeed, he is an undesirable figure to most Iraqi political blocs, and even some of his allies in the Iraqi National Alliance.

During his six-year reign, Maliki has provided his people nothing on the security front, deteriorating public services, and fast-spreading corruption that now prevails at most state institutions, which is another great setback for Iraqis. Maliki is also considered undesirable by America’s allies in the Gulf. Neither is he favored by Turkey, a key NATO member state. Due to interlocking interests in a region and with the drums of war growing louder, Iraq may once again fall victim, thanks to the policies of people they don’t understand and indecision about who to align with.

The bottom line is that in today’s world, leaders must first reconcile with their own people before doing so with outsiders. If you are an outcast in your own home, then you cannot expect outsiders to like and welcome you. And if they do, it is undoubtedly because they are looking out for their interests, and not yours.

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